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By authors: Peter Moruzzi, Peter Moruzzi
Product Code: 07403
ISBN: 978-1-4236-0740-3
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Gibbs Smith
Availability: In stock.
Hardback $30.00 Qty: 
Classic Dining

Peter Moruzzi takes you to America's finest mid-century restaurants-continental-style fine dining establishments, historic steakhouses, lounge restaurants, and Polynesian palaces-that persevere in U.S. cities large and small. Through exclusive new and vintage photography, Moruzzi celebrates culinary pioneers and multigeneration restaurateurs, uncovers authentic gems, and debunks the predicted demise of the white tablecloth restaurant. The book includes a comprehensive directory of over 200 classic restaurants found in cities from all 50 states.

Classic restaurants range from "continental-style" fine dining, with their softly lit wood-paneled interiors, starched tablecloths, curved booths, tuxedoed captains, and tableside service, to historic establishments retaining original character, decor, ambiance, and traditional menus. The many restaurants featured in this book are archetypal examples found throughout America. All share an inviting time-machine quality.

Cultural historian Peter Moruzzi is passionate about the mid-twentieth century: its nightlife, classic dining, and architecture. He is the author of the illustrated histories Havana Before Castro: When Cuba Was a Tropical Playground and Palm Springs Holiday: A Vintage Tour from Palm Springs to the Salton Sea, both published by Gibbs Smith. Moruzzi resides in the Silver Lake district of Los Angeles and in Palm Springs.

"A time capsule of midcentury restaurants, the kinds where every dish had two names: Oysters Rockefeller, Steak Diane, Cherries Jubilee, Bananas Foster." New York Times Style Magazine.

"explore what it was like to swagger one's way into swanky dining establishments in cities including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Las Vegas, and New Orleans during the Mad Men era. Learn about the establishments, some still with us and many long gone, where shish kabobs and bananas foster were grandly presented in flames, Caesar salad was prepared tableside, prime rib was served from fancy carts, and dishes such as oysters Rockefeller and lobster thermidor were the norm." Flavorwire

"a glossy, full-color, coast-to-coast tour of the restaurants your parents or grandparents went to on fancy occasions -- many of which are still with us, at least for the time being." LA Weekly

"Peter Moruzzi makes your mouth water with a lavishly illustrated trip to the finest historic eateries in America. Your job: eat at them before they disappear." John Rabe,"Off Ramp" KPCC.org

"The early-to-mid 20th century saw an explosion of "Continental Fine Dining" restaurants - dark-paneled places with with white tablecloths, where the entrees were named after billionaires, and the desserts were served flaming. Author Peter Moruzzi toured most of America's remaining examples of these time-machine restos to write his new book 'Classic Dining: Discovering Mid-Century Restaurants.'" Rico Gagliano, "The Dinner Party" American Public Media (NPR)

"Classic Dining: Discovering America's Finest Mid-Century Restaurants isn't just a history textbook, but also a living guidebook to the venerable old places that are still around today" L.J. Williamson, LA Weekly


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Review by: Chris Nichols, Los Angeles Magazine - November 1, 2012
Silver Lake historian Peter Moruzzi roamed the country in search of restaurants that offer a vintage night out. Classic Dining: Discovering America’s Finest Mid-Century Restaurants (Gibbs Smith, $30) is a culinary history and travelogue that stops in New Orleans, Chicago, and Vegas. Back in L.A., he pays homage to Lawry’s carving cart, the Dresden’s Blood and Sand, and the Dal Rae’s Caesar.
Review by: Stephen Heyman, New York Times- T Magazine Bookshelf - October 25, 2012
Peter Moruzzi’s “Classic Dining” (Gibbs Smith, $30) is a time capsule of midcentury restaurants, the kinds where every dish had two names: Oysters Rockefeller, Steak Diane, Cherries Jubilee, Bananas Foster.
Review: New York Times Style Magazine - November 18, 2012
"A time capsule of midcentury restaurants, the kinds where every dish had two names: Oysters Rockefeller, Steak Diane, Cherries Jubilee, Bananas Foster."
Review: Flavorwire - November 18, 2012
"explore what it was like to swagger one's way into swanky dining establishments in cities including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Las Vegas, and New Orleans during the Mad Men era. Learn about the establishments, some still with us and many long gone, where shish kabobs and bananas foster were grandly presented in flames, Caesar salad was prepared tableside, prime rib was served from fancy carts, and dishes such as oysters Rockefeller and lobster thermidor were the norm."
Review: LA Weekly - November 18, 2012
"a glossy, full-color, coast-to-coast tour of the restaurants your parents or grandparents went to on fancy occasions -- many of which are still with us, at least for the time being."
Review by: John Rabe, Off Ramp KPCC.org - November 18, 2012
"Peter Moruzzi makes your mouth water with a lavishly illustrated trip to the finest historic eateries in America. Your job: eat at them before they disappear."

Skip lunch, ditch the sneakers, and put on your sportcoat, honey, because tonight we're celebrating at the Dal Rae supper club in Pico Rivera.

It's the home of the best relish tray in North America and is one of the last bastions of tableside dining, where the maitre d' or owner wheels a cart over and makes your Steak Diane, Caesar Salad or Cherries Jubilee in front of you.

The Dal Rae is just one of the historic eateries Peter Moruzzi profiles, and Sven Kirsten photographs lovingly, in "Classic Dining: America's Finest Mid-Century Restaurants."

Review by: Rico Gagliano, "The Dinner Party" American Public Media (NPR) - November 15, 2012

The early-to-mid 20th century saw an explosion of “Continental Fine Dining” restaurants - dark-paneled places with with white tablecloths, where the entrees were named after billionaires, and the desserts were served flaming. Author Peter Moruzzi toured most of America’s remaining examples of these time-machine restos to write his new book “Classic Dining: Discovering Mid-Century Restaurants.” Rico talks with Peter about it over lobster and martinis at LA’s venerable Musso and Frank Grill. (Follow Peter’s map of classic restaurants to a notable eatery near you: http://petermoruzzi.com/classic-dining-map-of-america/)

"The Dinner Party" (www.dinnerpartydownload.com) is a smart, funny public radio show about everything excellent in culture, from the company that brings you "Marketplace." Think NPR meets Vanity Fair. In each episode, hosts Rico Gagliano & Brendan Francis Newnam talk with some of the world's most interesting celebrities, and along the way equip you with bad jokes, fresh drink recipes, hot food finds, odd news items... and etiquette tips from the likes of Henry Rollins and Dick Cavett. Past guests include Michelle Williams, Judd Apatow, Kid Cudi, Sir Richard Branson and others. Wallpaper magazine calls us one of their "40 Reasons To Live In The USA."

Review by: L.J. Williams, LA Weekly Blogs - November 12, 2012

Peter Moruzzi is on a crusade to save fine dining. An admirer of classic, historic restaurants since his youth, Moruzzi, an L.A.-based writer, started to become alarmed in recent years over the ever more rapid disappearance of America's dining history. So he decided to write a book about it.

Classic Dining: Discovering America's Finest Mid-Century Restaurants isn't just a history textbook, but also a living guidebook to the venerable old places that are still around today. "My hope was that a book focusing on the value of classic restaurants might inspire people to locate and frequent those survivors in their areas," Moruzzi says. "It was also to debunk the notion that white tablecloth establishments were deserving of extinction in favor of trendy restaurants with their hard surfaces and minimalist interiors."

Recently we sat down in a cushy vinyl booth with Moruzzi to learn more about his project.

Squid Ink: People who don't have an appreciation for these restaurants might not want to go, either because they think the food is going to be heavy or old fashioned. What would you say to get them to give some of these classic places a try?

Peter Moruzzi: I think people should go just so they can experience what dining was like in America before they were born. It's part of appreciating American history. If people have no interest in how their parents lived or how their parents ate, they're not going to go. But if they do, this gives them an opportunity to truly experience something that is part of our culinary past.

And yes, some of the food is rich and definitely not cutting edge, and the menu is old fashioned, but to me that's part of the excitement of going to places you are unfamiliar with and you want to experience. I like to go to cutting edge restaurants for the same reason. There's plenty of room for the traditional, old-style restaurants and the new. If people are just pigeonholed into eating at upscale or trendy restaurants, I think they're missing a lot. But that's my belief about life. That's why I seek out authenticity in architecture, authenticity in culture, and food in restaurants. It's all the same type of thinking.

SI: Historically, over time, would you say, though, that's it's kind of a good thing that food has generally trended healthier and lighter than it was at that time?

PI: I don't care about contemporary trends. I just don't. Yes, I think it's great that food has changed over time, and people are eating more home grown stuff. But that's not what I'm interested in. If I had my choice, I would eat every single meal at a traditional restaurant.

SI: But you said you like to go to a few newer places too!

PM:That's, right, I do, actually. In Silver Lake, I like Blair's, and I like Barbrix, and I like Forage. And I love Korean food. But the only one I go to is the one that has a charcoal grill in the middle of the table -- I don't like gas. Soot Bull Jeep, on 8th in Koreatown, near the old Ambassador. But there, there's a link to traditional restaurants -- the charcoal grill.

SI: Why do some of these places endure, while other places become tired and people lose interest?

PM: That's a really complicated question. There's a lot of reasons. It sometimes has to do with management -- it's either good or not so good. Quality falters, and people stop going there. The ones that survive are generally the ones that have superb service, a great menu -- and everything has been maintained. Often, the original owners just get tired, or move on, or die, and there's no one else to take over. Once those people go, then the restaurants often go too. Or they try to sell it but the person who buys it doesn't really have the same level of ability.

SI: Which of your favorite classic places in L.A. have the best something? The best waitress, the best bartender, like that?

PM: The best tableside prep is at the Dal Rae. The best lounge is The Dresden. The best traditional steakhouse would be Taylor's. The best theatrical presentation would be Lawry's. The most Hollywood would be Musso & Frank. Everybody on earth went there -- it's sort of the essence of Hollywood. Then Taix -- Taix is Taix. It's kind of quirky and fun and they've got a great bar. The French theme is not one that has survived anywhere else.

SI: At the Tam O'Shanter, I enjoyed the theme, the waitstaff, but the food was ... not great. In researching this book, do you feel like you've eaten a lot of great food?

PM: Some are better than others. Some you go to just for the atmosphere and the character. Others you're lucky to have that plus really good food. The Dal Rae is the best example of that. It's amazing there -- best Caesar salad I've ever had. Taylor's is a typical steakhouse -- I wouldn't say it's better than anywhere else. People go to Musso for different reasons -- I don't think they go there for the food per se -- they may go there for the atmosphere, for the history, for the cocktails. I don't generally rate these places based on quality of food. In fact, I don't ever rate them based on quality of food. It's the whole package. But if the food was realy awful, they probably wouldn't be in business anymore.

SI: So if you were condemed and had to pick a last meal, where would you go?

PM: Dal Rae, or Galatoire's in New Orleans. A completely different dining experience. It's old, it's in New Orleans. Incredible food, incredible atmosphere, the waiters have been there a hundred years, a great location, you have to wear a jacket, and if you don't they give you one. I've never been to a restaurant where the customers actually know each other, and they have their own waiters that they ask for by name.

SI: Do those customers tend to skew older?

PM: No, it's interesting, it's multigenerational. It's been around so long, every generation brings their kids, the whole family. Antoine's is like that as well. New Orleans is its own world. It's completely different than any place I've ever been, and the food on average, the quality is so high. They have to have their quality high, or they will go out of business. People in New Orleans demand it.

SI: Who has the better restaurants, the West Coast or the East?

PM: You can't compare New Orleans to Los Angeles, or San Francisco to New York. In terms of steakhouses, probably New York has better ones overall. The West Coast is definitely better at doing themed restaurants -- there are far more themed restaurants in California than other parts of the country.

SI: What do you think, 40 or 50 years from now, which trends that we have now do you think will be preserved or will stand out to people in the future?

PM: I have no idea. The same question has been asked in architecture, because I'm an architectural historian. They say, "What kind of architecture that's being created now will stand the test of time?" I have no bloody idea. There's stuff that's fairly obvious -- Disney Hall, of course, or you could say some of the buildings at LACMA. But I have no idea what's going to stand the test of time a few years from now. I mean, people in the '50s and '60s, as far as I know, would have never said that Googie coffee shops would have stood the test of time and that they represent an era. Then, they were functional. It drew people's attention, and they would stop. But at the time, people didn't recognize it.

SI: When you go to a contemporary restaurant, do you ever get the feeling that something is missing that restaurateurs could gain by hanging on to?

PM: Yes -- tableside preparation. I think that if restaurants brought that back, people would really enjoy it. I think there's ways you could do contemporary cooking with tableside, if you're clever. And I really like tablecloths and vinyl booths. I don't like these hard chairs and hard surfaces and noisy rooms. I think they should go back to darker interiors, more mood lighting, booths, and white tablecloths.

SI: Yeah -- noisy is kind of trendy, isn't it?

PM: I guess. You can't even have a conversation in some places. The thing about classic restaurants is that they specifically were acoustically tuned so you could hear somebody at the end of a table that had six or eight people at it. Like The Dresden -- it has cork everywhere. they sort though all that noise. You could talk, and you could take a lot more time eating in these classic restaurants. You didn't' just come in and out. And there were a lot more courses, too. People would have dessert, they would have cognac, and they'd have coffee. It's a different way of dining.

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